Trail of Story, Travellers’ Path

| 0

Reflections on Ethnoecology and Landscape

by Leslie Main Johnson

three images: mountains with forest; forest; dry cracked mud

Trail of Story examines the meaning of landscape, drawn from Leslie Main Johnson’s rich experience with diverse environments and peoples, including the Gitksan and Witsuwit’en of northwestern British Columbia, the Kaska Dene of the southern Yukon, and the Gwich’in of the Mackenzie Delta.

With passion and conviction, Johnson maintains that our response to our environment shapes our culture, determines our lifestyle, defines our identity, and sets the tone for our relationships and economies. With photos, she documents the landscape and contrasts the ecological relationships with land of First Nations peoples to those of non-indigenous scientists. The result is an absorbing study of local knowledge of place and a broad exploration of the meaning of landscape.

Published:
Publisher: UBC Press
Tags:

About the Author

Leslie Main Johnson is Associate Professor in the Centre for Social Sciences. View Leslie's faculty page.


Landscape Ethnoecology

| 0

Concepts of Biotic and Physical Space

photo of a Boreal forest

Edited by Leslie Main Johnson and Eugene S. Hunn

Although anthropologists and cultural geographers have explored “place” in various senses, little cross-cultural examination of “kinds of place,” or ecotopes, has been presented from an ethno-ecological perspective. In this volume, indigenous and local understandings of landscape are investigated in order to better understand how human communities relate to their terrestrial and aquatic resources. The contributors go beyond the traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) literature and offer valuable insights on ecology and on land and resources management, emphasizing the perception of landscape above the level of species and their folk classification. Focusing on the ways traditional people perceive and manage land and biotic resources within diverse regional and cultural settings, the contributors address theoretical issues and present case studies from North America, Mexico, Amazonia, tropical Asia, Africa and Europe.

Published:
Publisher: Berghahn Books
Editors:
Tags:

Winning Back the Words

| 0

Confronting Experts in an Environmental Public Hearing

by Mike Gismondi

book cover

By Mary Richardson, Joan Sherman, and Michael Gismondi

Winning Back the Words chronicles the politics of the environmental public hearings on the Alberta-Pacific bleached kraft pulp mill in northern Alberta, and illustrates how the public challenged the authority of experts. Drawing from their own experiences in the hearings, the authors recreate the power struggles among participants over the words and discourses used to debate the impact of the mill on the environment. Controversies about science and values, sustainable development, and local knowledge suggest promising new directions in environmental review.

Published:
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
Tags:

About the Author

Mike Gismondi is Professor of Sociology and Global Studies in the Centre for Social Sciences. View Mike's faculty page.


Challenging Legitimacy at the Precipice of Energy Calamity

| 0

by Mike Gismondi

book cover

by Debra J. Davidson and Mike Gismondi

Two intersecting moments of the Twenty-first Century define our politics, economies, and future prospects for civilization: the mounting evidence for global climate change, now unequivocally attributed to socio-economic activities, and its de-stabilizing effects on our biosphere, combined with the end of easy oil and the easy wealth it generates. On the energy question, non-conventional fossil fuels have been promoted by political elites as the next most attractive development option. The development of nonconventional fuels, however, does nothing to alleviate either climate change or the falling rate of energy supply, and generates multiple social and environmental consequences. The largest endeavour marking this historic nexus—indeed the largest industrial project in history, is the extraction and processing of the Athabasca tar sands in Alberta, Canada. The social, environmental, and most importantly political outcomes of this grand experiment will reverberate throughout the global polity, and either encourage or caution against increasing our dependence on such non-conventional fuels and assuming the multiple costs such dependence will entail. Planning for reflexive societal change requires that we first ask how such giga-projects are legitimated, and who is challenging this legitimacy? In this book we trace how language and visual representations are used to reinforce or challenge the legitimacy of development of the Athabasca tar sands, and draw on our insights to contemplate likely energy and climate futures.

Published:
Publisher: Springer
Tags:

About the Author

Mike Gismondi is Professor of Sociology and Global Studies in the Centre for Social Sciences. View Mike's faculty page.